the Stream

*

It's got a bit of history behind it (see below), but in a nutshell I think of the stream as the type of stuff that gets posted on Twitter or Facebook. Reverse chronological microblogging, essentially.

the-stream.jpg

I guess the stream refers to both 'my stream', and the big stream of things that I subscribe to.

1 Why is it useful

For me the stream is useful because:

  • my stream is a way to share my thoughts
  • people responding to my stream is a way to learn
  • the big stream is a way to seek out new ideas and learn from others

2 History of the metaphor

The Stream is a newer metaphor with old roots. We can think of the”event stream” of programming, the “lifestream” proposed by researchers in the 1990s. More recently, the term stream has been applied to the never ending parade of twitter, news alerts, and Facebook feeds.

In the stream metaphor you don’t experience the Stream by walking around it and looking at it, or following it to its end. You jump in and let it flow past. You feel the force of it hit you as things float by.

It’s not that you are passive in the Stream. You can be active. But your actions in there — your blog posts, @ mentions, forum comments — exist in a context that is collapsed down to a simple timeline of events that together form a narrative.

In other words, the Stream replaces topology with serialization. Rather than imagine a timeless world of connection and multiple paths, the Stream presents us with a single, time ordered path with our experience (and only our experience) at the center.

The Garden and the Stream: A Technopastoral

3 Misc

Active vs passive streams?

e.g. a stream of notes (active), vs a stream of all recent changes (passive).

4 Elsewhere in the garden

Notes that link to this note (AKA backlinks).

Chris has talked enthusiastically about interlinking wikis before (e.g. during the Gardens and Streams IndieWeb session), so that's a good indicator that there's something to it. For me, perhaps because my wiki is still fairly new, or maybe because I already get the interactivity goodness on my stream and my articles, it's something I haven't generally been that interested in for my wiki notes thus far.

[NOTE: this is pretty wiki/garden focused - I would like to take this up a level to also include the stream stuff I want, too. That's currently kind of separate in blog tooling.]

Currently working out how I write and share and evolve my thoughts in my blog and wiki combo. At the moment I'm trying to start with the stream, my flow, and then incorporate that back into the garden/stock.

I'm trying this out at the moment - putting thoughts in the stream, linking them back to ideas in the wiki, and updating those wiki pages as I go along. Going alright so far.

  • 2021-05-02
  • I'd quite like a more automated way of copying my notes here in these daily logs more easily in to some kind of stream where people see it and reply. I've still not quite cracked that nut in a way that I would like, so I just periodically manually copy stuff in to my stream. (Mostly the Mastodon stream at the moment. I'd prefer to push it to my website stream first, but that's even more friction.) It's not the end of the world, but would be nice to have it all synced up.
  • Citizen Shift.
    • I saw Jon Alexander talk on this at TICTeC one year. I liked the idea - make it easy to regularly exercise civic muscle. Not just every 4 to 5 years of an election cycle.
  • Listened: Nathan Schneider - Cooperatives, the Commons and Ownership
  • IndieWeb and personal wikis

IndieWeb sometimes feels pretty stream focused.

I've found that Phil's recent changes page is a nice entry point in to ThoughtStorms. It's a very low-effort stream - it just falls out of the changes that you are already making.

the-stream.jpg

I water my garden to help it grow. I get the water from the stream.

The social part is definitely important though because I want to learn through discussion. Don't just want to be typing into the void, in dialectic only with myself. The stream is perhaps more for that - networked learning, connectivism.

The stream is an entrypoint into the garden. I water my garden to help it grow. I get the water from the stream.

The stream is an entrypoint into the garden. I water my garden to help it grow. I get the water from the stream.

This is my garden,
This is my stream,
This is for thinking,
This is for memes.

The stream stuff, to some degree we're playing catchup. But other than a photo album here, a pin there, an 'on this day' here, there's very little mainstream investment in letting you turn your stream into a commonplace books, your knowledge base over time.

I water my garden to help it grow. I get the water from the stream.

Somewhere in between the stream and the garden? A place for conversations.

The stream stuff, to some degree we're playing catchup. But other than a photo album here, a pin there, an 'on this day' here, there's very little mainstream investment in letting you turn your stream into a commonplace books, your knowledge base over time.

I'm trying this out at the moment - putting thoughts in the stream, linking them back to ideas in the wiki, and updating those wiki pages as I go along.

Here I would take 'blog' to mean blog articles, not stream per se. Plenty of unpolished stuff on the stream.

Chris has talked enthusiastically about interlinking wikis before (e.g. during the Gardens and Streams IndieWeb session), so I'm sure there's something to it. For me, I think because I already get the interactivity goodness on my stream and my articles, it's something I haven't generally been that interested in for my wiki notes thus far.

I like his use case of pulling his newsletter back in to his garden. I do the same with my microblog stream. I think it makes perfect sense to do this - gardens are where we cultivate our thoughts over time, but streams are a great (the best?) source for the seeds for the garden.

  • Wikis I like
  • Phil Jones's ThoughtStorms. Phil has been doing it for a long time. It has an old school look and I really like that. In terms of content, it's precisely what I want to read in someone else's wiki - a hot mix of quick thoughts and long-evolved ideas to stumble through. It's got wiki personality.
    • Bill Seitz. Bill's is chock full of history and content too. It has a bliki feel (in fact, Bill calls it a WikiLog) - it has a stream of recent changes right on the landing page as an entry point to the rest of what's there.
    • Ton's wiki. Ton's has a very strong link to his blog (the wiki is embedded in it and mainly an index of posts from the blog). I like to see blogs and wikis intertwingled. You could argue that Ton's whole site is a wiki or digital garden of sorts - most 'blog' posts will link to previous thoughts on the topic.
    • h0p3's wiki. I have not really delved deeply into h0p3's wiki, but there are a friend of Kicks. Their wiki is some between 'wiki as personality' and wiki as performance art.
    • Emsenn's Digital Garden. Their site has gone through a few incarnations, and the latest is a digital garden created and published via org-roam. Lots of interesting stories to be found when taking a drift through their rhizomatous writing.
    • Nadia Eghbal . 'Learning in public' - I like that sentiment. Not really a wiki (perhaps I should remove from here…). I also like how Nadia's writing combines cultural references with other ideas. I definitely want to make those same kind of links in my wiki / blog.
    • Nick Sellen's ponderings. I like Nick's ponderings as an example of someone thinking out loud to themselves, in a way of interest to others.
    • Chris Aldrich's wiki. Chris has just started up a TiddlyWiki, and you can be certain he'll do something interesting with it.
    • Anne-Laure's Mental Nodes. Nice, clean design, and the backlinks and transclusion work really well for browsing around. Plus I love the content.
    • gwern.net. A long site with long content.
    • Maggie Appleton's Digital Garden. Full of amazing thoughts and research and looks gorgeous.
  • Blog tooling

For my blog (my 'stream') I use WordPress and all the IndieWeb plugins.

This page last updated: 2021-07-24 Sat 12:02. Map. Recent changes. Source. Peer Production License. Webring: << random >>