The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

*
URL
https://therestartproject.org/news/the-uks-new-right-to-repair-is-not-a-right-to-repair/
Author
Libby Peake / Ugo Vallauri
Publisher
The Restart Project

1 Elsewhere in the garden

Notes that link to this note (AKA backlinks).

the three pillars of the right to repair, which are: 1. products need to be designed for repairability; 2. spare parts and repair services need to be affordable; and 3. people should have access to the information they need to carry out repairs.

The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

This means that if, for example, the bearings in your washing machine fail, you’ll still have no choice but to replace the entire drum, with costs comparable to replacing the machine. Similarly, when the heater in a dishwasher fails, you’ll have to replace the entire heat pump, doubling the cost of repair, even though the pump may still be working.

The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

the UK produces more electronic waste per person than anywhere in the world apart from Norway. At 23.9kg a year per person, that’s more than the weight of a suitcase you’d typically be allowed to take with you onto a plane.

The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

People really care about reducing waste. Witness the outrage at the recent revelations of Amazon’s policy of destroying unsold or returned goods in the UK.

The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

Green Alliance’s research with Cardiff University in 2018 showed 75 per cent of people in the UK want the government to require manufacturers to make products more repairable.

The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

  • Right to Repair in the UK
  • The main barrier to repair has not been addressed
  • Only a few products are included in the legislation
  • It doesn’t extend to a consumer right to repair

    Last week, the UK adopted what it described as “tough new rules” meaning that manufacturers will have to make repair information and spare parts available for repairs for up to ten years for some new white goods and televisions. The move aligns Great Britain with the EU and Northern Ireland, where the same legislation came into effect in March.

    The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

    In announcing the new standards, the government boasted it was giving us all a new “legal right for repair”. However, this is not true. In reality we are still far from having such a legal right in the UK.

    The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

    This new regulation doesn’t put any caps on the prices that manufacturers can charge for spare parts. And it does nothing to make repair more financially attractive to consumers, for instance by removing VAT, which could reduce the cost of all professional repairs.

    The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

  • Right to Repair in the UK
  • The main barrier to repair has not been addressed
  • Only a few products are included in the legislation
  • It doesn’t extend to a consumer right to repair

    Last week, the UK adopted what it described as “tough new rules” meaning that manufacturers will have to make repair information and spare parts available for repairs for up to ten years for some new white goods and televisions. The move aligns Great Britain with the EU and Northern Ireland, where the same legislation came into effect in March.

    The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

    In announcing the new standards, the government boasted it was giving us all a new “legal right for repair”. However, this is not true. In reality we are still far from having such a legal right in the UK.

    The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

    This new regulation doesn’t put any caps on the prices that manufacturers can charge for spare parts. And it does nothing to make repair more financially attractive to consumers, for instance by removing VAT, which could reduce the cost of all professional repairs.

    The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

  • Right to Repair in the UK
  • The main barrier to repair has not been addressed
  • Only a few products are included in the legislation
  • It doesn’t extend to a consumer right to repair

    Last week, the UK adopted what it described as “tough new rules” meaning that manufacturers will have to make repair information and spare parts available for repairs for up to ten years for some new white goods and televisions. The move aligns Great Britain with the EU and Northern Ireland, where the same legislation came into effect in March.

    The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

    In announcing the new standards, the government boasted it was giving us all a new “legal right for repair”. However, this is not true. In reality we are still far from having such a legal right in the UK.

    The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

    This new regulation doesn’t put any caps on the prices that manufacturers can charge for spare parts. And it does nothing to make repair more financially attractive to consumers, for instance by removing VAT, which could reduce the cost of all professional repairs.

    The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

  • Right to Repair in the UK

The legislation also allows the practice of ‘bundling’ multiple smaller components together with some common spare parts.

The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

What’s more, the new regulations only tackle a few product categories: washing machines, dishwashers, fridges and electronic screens, including TVs. We know that work is ongoing at the EU level to bring repairability requirements to products such as smartphones, tablets and laptops, but it’s not yet clear whether the UK will follow suit.

The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

White goods repairers highlight the cost of spare parts as the main reason pushing people to replace a product, rather than repair it.

The UK’s new ‘right to repair’ is not a right to repair

This page last updated: 2021-07-24 Sat 12:02. Map. Recent changes. Source. Peer Production License. Webring: << random >>