dérive

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Psychogeographers advocate the act of becoming lost in the city. This is done through the dérive, or “drift”.

Psychogeography: a way to delve into the soul of a city

Because purposeful walking has an agenda, we do not adequately absorb certain aspects of the urban world. This is why the drift is essential to psychogeography; it better connects walkers to the city.

Psychogeography: a way to delve into the soul of a city

1 Elsewhere in the garden

Notes that link to this note (AKA backlinks).

…So I have been thinking about the idea of digital psychogeography, drifting through hypertext. Perhaps as a means of rediscovering lost history, and maybe as a way to break out of self- and algorithmically-prescribed filter bubbles.

Psychogeographers advocate the act of becoming lost in the city. This is done through the dérive, or “drift”.

…So I have been thinking about the idea of digital psychogeography, drifting through hypertext. Perhaps as a means of rediscovering lost history, and maybe as a way to break out of self- and algorithmically-prescribed filter bubbles.

Psychogeographers advocate the act of becoming lost in the city. This is done through the dérive, or “drift”.

Psychogeography: a way to delve into the soul of a city

  • Wikis I like
  • Phil Jones's ThoughtStorms. Phil has been doing it for a long time. It has an old school look and I really like that. In terms of content, it's precisely what I want to read in someone else's wiki - a hot mix of quick thoughts and long-evolved ideas to stumble through. It's got wiki personality.
    • Bill Seitz. Bill's is chock full of history and content too. It has a bliki feel (in fact, Bill calls it a WikiLog) - it has a stream of recent changes right on the landing page as an entry point to the rest of what's there.
    • Ton's wiki. Ton's has a very strong link to his blog (the wiki is embedded in it and mainly an index of posts from the blog). I like to see blogs and wikis intertwingled. You could argue that Ton's whole site is a wiki or digital garden of sorts - most 'blog' posts will link to previous thoughts on the topic.
    • h0p3's wiki. I have not really delved deeply into h0p3's wiki, but there are a friend of Kicks. Their wiki is some between 'wiki as personality' and wiki as performance art.
    • Emsenn's Digital Garden. Their site has gone through a few incarnations, and the latest is a digital garden created and published via org-roam. Lots of interesting stories to be found when taking a drift through their rhizomatous writing.
    • Nadia Eghbal . 'Learning in public' - I like that sentiment. Not really a wiki (perhaps I should remove from here…). I also like how Nadia's writing combines cultural references with other ideas. I definitely want to make those same kind of links in my wiki / blog.
    • Nick Sellen's ponderings. I like Nick's ponderings as an example of someone thinking out loud to themselves, in a way of interest to others.
    • Chris Aldrich's wiki. Chris has just started up a TiddlyWiki, and you can be certain he'll do something interesting with it.
    • Anne-Laure's Mental Nodes. Nice, clean design, and the backlinks and transclusion work really well for browsing around. Plus I love the content.
    • gwern.net. A long site with long content.
    • Maggie Appleton's Digital Garden. Full of amazing thoughts and research and looks gorgeous.
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